a pinch or pack of perfect spices...

Cajun Creole can be used in many ways but one of our favorites is making crawfish. Corn and tomatoes are always a needed for a great crawfish dish. Some call this Cajun smothered corn. You can also use canned whole kernel combined with cream style corn. Another cool recipe is to add an ounce of CCB to a pound of ground beef and fry some Cajun sliders…delicious.

Named in reference to the woody stems attached to the pod. The Spanish translation of the name means “treelike.” This chile, which is related to the cayenne and pequin, has a rich red color and a thin flesh. They are hot, slender, tubular peppers, about 2 to 3 inches long, and bright green when immature, turning a bright red at maturity. They are most commonly found dried.

Ancho means ‘wide’, its flat heart shape creating one of the largest chiles, a dried Poblano. It is sweet, with hints of raisin and plum. The ancho is one of the most commonly used chiles in Mexico and is a basic ingredient for making many Mexican style sauces. The ancho, along with the mulato and pasilla form the “holy trinity”of chiles used to make traditional Mexican mole sauces.

Montreal Steak Spice is a dry spice rub used to flavor steak that was made famous in Montreal and has become a marketing term for a number of commercial spice mixes. The recipe varies, but Montreal Steak Spice usually includes ingredients such as pepper, salt, coriander, dill, mustard seeds, dehydrated garlic and onions, red pepper flakes, rosemary, thyme, paprika and caraway seeds.

An exotic infusion of toasted coconut and all-natural cane sugar, this is a sweet treat with the lush aroma and flavor of fresh coconuts. Reminiscent of the flavor of pina coladas, our Coconut Sugar is delicious as a drink rimmer, on top of fresh fruit, or sprinkled over sweet BBQ glazed ribs or grilled prawns.

Sun-ripened raspberries and all-natural cane sugar combine to create a deliciously fruity ingredient, perfect for topping desserts, fresh summer salads and rimming glasses. The bright, real raspberry color of this extraordinary sugar makes it beautiful when presented table-side or as a topping on appetizers, entrées or desserts.

Used in cuisines all over the world, the flavor  of real cloves is blended with organic cane sugar. The aroma and taste of whole cloves are captured ideally in a sprinkle-able, sweet topping. Very versatile, this sugar is easily added to hot drinks, grilled meats, sauces, and spiced desserts.

The traditional taste of cinnamon and sugar is taken to a new level. With a rich, delicious and surprising depth of flavor, real Korintje cinnamon is used and fused with all natural cane sugar producing a unique ingredient with beautiful color and texture. Perfect for baking, cooking, and adding to drinks and desserts.

Straight from wild blueberry fields and condensed into a deliciously sweet package, the taste of fresh, whole blueberries explodes in your mouth. The beautiful indigo color of blueberry sugar will make you want to use it on everything.

Tahitian vanilla beans and real cane sugar are blended to create a sweet, rich flavor that is the perfect addition to hot tea, coffee, cookies and desserts, fruit and much more. Vanilla Bean Sugar has a delicate texture and full flavor which make it a beautiful and easy addition to a wide-range of dishes and recipes.

Roasted Garlic Sea Salt is all natural sea salt infused with real roasted garlic! This is a much improved, very gourmet version of traditional garlic salt. The flavor is out of this world. Try it on absolutely anything.

The pink peppercorn is the semi-ripe berry of the schinus bush and not a true peppercorn. Often used as a component of “gourmet pepper” for grinding we discourage this as the
green and black peppercorns easily overpower this sweet and mild spice. Try grinding it fresh with cumin and thyme as a seasoning for swordfish or chicken. We also like it in cabbage slaw or along with a light basil pesto.

The natural flavor of lemon is an international favorite. Thai food, margaritas, desserts… the uses are plentiful. Lemon Twist Salt is tart without being too sour. It is refreshing and versatile. Use to rim a drink glass, sprinkle on chicken or fish before grilling or add to a crisp salad for a surprising hint of citrus.

Green pepper is from the same fruit as the black, but is harvested before they mature. Green pepper is milder with a cleaner, fresher flavor. Green peppercorns can be mashed with garlic, cinnamon or to make a spiced butter or with cream to make a fresh and attractive sauce for fish. It is often used in white sauces rather than black pepper, which would give the sauce a speckled appearance. It’s best ground directly on to food. With hot food it is best to add pepper well towards the end of the cooking process, to preserve its aroma.

The classic combination of lemon and sugar is perfectly captured in our lemon sugar. All-natural and with just the right amount of citrusy flavor, a fresh addition to savory and sweet dishes. Ideal for baking, rimming a glass, summer salads, and so much more.

Widely used in savoury dishes and meat, poultry, seafood and vegetable curries. It harmonizes well with coconut milk, especially with chicken or seafood, and there are countless Thai and Sri Lankan recipes exploiting this combination. The stems are also used in teas or used in pickles and in flavoring marinades.

As well as flavoring a dish, juniper cuts the gaminess of game, reduces the fatty effect of duck and pork and perks up a bread stuffing. Gin gets its unique flavor from it and fruit dishes, such as apple tart and pickled peaches, also harmonize with this flavor.

Goji berries, aka Chinese Wolfberries, have become popular as a health food. They are rich in antioxidants, particularly eye-protecting carotenoids such as beta-carotene and zeaxanthin. Yummy in porridge, smoothies, trail mixes, teas, tossed in rice and salads. They soften when soaked in water.

In China, dried gojis are often added to rice congee and almond jelly, as well as used in Chinese tonic soups, in combination with chicken or pork, vegetables, and other herbs such as wild yam. The berries are also boiled as an herbal tea, often along with chrysanthemum flowers and/or red jujubes, or particularly with pu-erh tea.